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Dallas World Aquarium

Page history last edited by PBworks 13 years, 11 months ago

The Dallas World Aquarium

 

If you have a chance to visit Dallas Texas, you should come to the Dallas World Aquarium. It’s located on Griffin Street in Dallas, Texas.  It is open from 10:00 in the morning and closes at 5:00 each day of the week and is only closed on Thanksgiving and Christmas.  It only cost you $16.95 if you are an adult, $9.95 if you are anywhere from three to twelve years old, $13.95 if you are sixty or older, and free for children under 2.  A trip to The Dallas World Aquarium helps you experience more about plants and animals. There are so many different things for you to see at the Dallas World Aquarium but the three most interesting things are the big walk through fish tank with a 22,000 gallon tunnel, the giant fish tank with a lot of different kinds of fish and turtles, and the displays that represent marine life from around the world.

            It is not hard to get there. You can go by train or bus. It costs $2.50 to go there by the D.A.R.T train, and you don’t have to worry about a parking fee in downtown Dallas. Whenever you get off the train, you need to walk about five or ten minutes to get to the Dallas World Aquarium. The first thing you’ll see is the sign that reads, “Parking for Aquarium”. Then you’ll see the big building with blue glass on the top and the red walls. If you walk toward the building you’ll see the sign “Aquarium Entrance”. If you follow that sign you’ll see the street that has a lot of bamboo on the sidewalk. Follow that sidewalk until you reach the front entrance. The front entrance has a big sign that says “DALLAS WORLD AQUARIUM”. Around the front entrance there are so many bamboo and plants. When you get inside the building you will see a winding path which takes you to the admission window. Pass the admission window and you will see the door that takes you into the aquarium. Behind that door, on your left is a big screen which shows you a preview of the aquarium and in front of you are stairs that take you to the third floor. The Dallas World Aquarium has 3 stories: the canopy level, an under water level, and an under story level.

 

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         The canopy level has interesting animals. First of all, the Sloth, which is always wearing a smile and moving very slowly, is a rainforest favorite. Second, there are giant river otters.  These are known as “Lobo Del Rio”, or river wolves in South America, and are now threatened with extinction.  This is largely due to the value of their pelts.  Then, some of the many species of toucans seen are the Red-billed, Keel-billed, and Swanson’s. Black-necked and green aracaris are often seen flying from tree to tree.

 

 

 

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         The under story level has so many sections: the Crocodile Cove, Cave, River Edge, Flooded Forest, and Rainforest Trail.  Every section has different kinds of animals. The Crocodile cove has the Orinoco Crocodile, Red bellied piranha, Cotton top tamarin, Bare-throated bell bird, and the Pacu. The Flood Forest has Iguana Silver arowana, ornate horned frog, Mata mata, Amazon yellow-spotted river turtle, Freshwater stingray, and Electric eel. Especially, the Cave has Poison dart frogs, Emerald tree boa constrictors, and more different kinds of animals.

 

 

 

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          One of the most interesting things that you have to see at the Dallas World Aquarium is the big walk through fish tank with a 22,000 gallon tunnel. It is located at level one of the aquarium. Bull sharks and brown sharks are seen swimming around.  These sharks are swimming around guests as they walk through the large tank.  The Dallas World Aquarium states, “This 400,000-gallon exhibit represents the underground pools which were vital to the survival of the people in the Yucatan region”. Besides the Sharks, there are also so many Freshwater stingrays in that tank. The Dallas World Aquarium website also states, “The body of an average adult freshwater stingray is 12 inches (30.5 cm) in length with a tail that can reach 8 inches (20.3 cm)”.

 

 

 

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         The second thing that you should see when you come to the Dallas World Aquarium is the giant fish tank with a lot of different kinds of fish, sea turtles, and stingrays. Watching all the sea turtles, stingrays, and a lot of different kinds of big fish swimming around in a large fish tank can seem magical. Can you imagine that you can see a catfish that weighs a hundred pounds swimming in front of you?  A big wall made of glass separates the fish and you.

 

 

 

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       Ten displays that hold 2,000 gallons of water present marine life from all over the planet.  Some of the places I saw were Palau, Southern Australia, Lord Howe Island, the Solomon Islands, Fiji, the Bahamas, British Colombia, sri Lanka, Indonesia and Japan.   This is my favorite section at the aquarium. You will see the beautiful Moon jellyfish don’t have a heart, brain, kidneys, or a circulatory system.  They are seeing through, and on the Dallas World Aquarium website it says that “the Moon Jelly is 90-95% water, and in their natural environment, they can reach 10 inches or more in diameter”. The leafy seadragon is also my favorite animal. The Leafy seadragons are green, orange and gold, and are covered with what looks like leaves, which makes it very camouflaged.  The only time you notice them is when the “leaves” move or one of the eyes move.

 

 

 

 

 

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Like I said at the beginning, Dallas has so many interesting places for you to visit. The most wonderful place that you should go when you come to Dallas is Dallas World Aquarium. This was my first time at the Dallas World Aquarium. I have never seen so many different types of animals as I saw here in one place. I really suggest visiting the aquarium for yourself. You’ll never understand what I felt after I went to the Dallas World Aquarium until you experience it with your own eyes.

Comments (5)

Anonymous said

at 5:17 am on Oct 27, 2007

1. Did you find this essay interesting?

Yes I found this essay interesting. I like the way you described each point of the aquarium. Also, I like how you describe the animals and plants. I´ve never been in any aquarium, but you have pictured very well this aquarium which makes me attracted by this space.

2. Is the essay well organized? If not, suggest ways to improve it.

This essay is pretty organized and it is easy to read. Although you have some grammar mistakes I can understand the main idea about the aquarium.

3. Is there anything in the essay that is not clear to you? If so, ask the writer for clarification.

You mentioned something about Yucatan region. Can you explain how the underground pools were vital to the survival of the people in Yucatan?

4. Does the essay have graphics? (It should have a minimum of one.) Comment on the effectiveness of the graphic/graphics.

I like your pictures, but the way that these pictures and videos are shown are not easy to follow. You can publish some pictures as reference in each part of your description and create an album in another space where they can be seen orderly.

5. Make any additional comments that the student will find useful. Remember he/she wants to get a good grade and is depending on you to help!

In general, your essay looks good. You should work a little bit more in your introduction and conclusion. In the introduction you should create an expectation about how much you can learn in the aquarium. Also, in the conclusion you should write more about the experience visiting the aquarium.

Anonymous said

at 11:46 am on Oct 28, 2007

I really enjoyed reading your essay. I learned a lot about the aquarium and I feel as if I had actually been there myself. I like your organization and your personal approach. Where did you get the videos?

Anonymous said

at 5:35 am on Nov 1, 2007

very very good cici!!!!

Anonymous said

at 6:41 am on Nov 1, 2007

Hi Reinaldo Medina!

Thank you for your comment. I try my best to adjust my essay. Hopefully, you will see the different. However, the question that you asked me about the people in Yucatan I don't know much about it. I got that sentence on the Dallas World Aquarium website. If you need some more informations, you should visit the website. You might find what you need on the website. Thank you!

Anonymous said

at 6:50 am on Nov 1, 2007

Hi Mrs Meloni!
Thank you very much for your comment! It means so much to me. Those video that you see on my essay are mine. I used my camera to firm them. I didn't use any picture which can find on the internet. I took every single pictures and videos by myself. You should visit Dallas. Our class will take you go to the aquarium. :) By the way, Happy Halloween to you!

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